Our Health Library information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist our patients to learn more about their health. Our providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Search Results

Your searched on: hearing disorders

Hearing Loss
Includes info on hearing loss. Discusses causes and symptoms like tinnitus, muffled hearing, and vertigo. Covers exams and tests used to diagnose hearing loss. Discusses treatment with medicine, hearing aids, or cochlear implant.

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
Hearing loss caused by noise can occur in people of any age. It may develop suddenly or gradually, depending on the source and intensity of the noise. Noise can affect hearing in several ways. When a sudden, extremely loud sound, such as an...

Age-Related Hearing Loss
Age-related hearing loss, known as presbycusis, affects most older adults to some degree. The most frequent cause of age-related hearing loss is the natural breakdown of nerve cells in the inner ear. Sound reaches the inner ear, but the breakdown of...

Hearing Protectors
Being exposed to loud noises can result in hearing loss. As the loudness of a sound increases, the amount of time you can safely listen to the sound decreases. One way to protect your hearing is to wear hearing protectors, which reduce the loudness...

Hearing Loss: Should I Get Hearing Aids?
Guides through decision to get hearing aids. Explains the types of hearing aids, how they work, and how they are best used. Covers benefits and risks. Includes an interactive tool to help you make your decision.

Screening for Hearing Problems
Some hearing problems can delay your child's speech and language development. Early screening for hearing loss can help prevent many learning, social, and emotional problems that can be related to speech and language development. Call your...

Medicines That Cause Hearing Loss
Medicines that damage the ear and cause hearing loss are known as ototoxic medicines. They are a common cause of hearing loss, especially in older adults who have to take medicine on a regular basis. In most cases, hearing loss occurs because the...

Ear Infection and Hearing Loss
An ear infection may sometimes cause a temporary or reversible hearing loss. This generally occurs because the infection blocks sound from passing through the ear canal or middle ear to the inner ear. When sound is blocked like this, it is...

Evaluating Your Child's Hearing
Fluid may remain in the middle ear (serous otitis, or middle ear effusion) after your child has an ear infection. This may not cause symptoms, or it may cause a muffling of sound, decreased hearing, and mild discomfort. The body usually...

Harmful Noise Levels
The effects of noise on hearing vary among people. Some people's ears are more sensitive to loud sounds, especially at certain frequencies. (Frequency means how low or high a tone is.) But any sound that is loud enough and lasts long enough can...

Congenital Heart Defects
Discusses problems with how a baby's heart forms. Also looks at problems found when a person is an adult. Includes info on patent ductus arteriosus, aortic valve stenosis, and coarctation of the aorta. Covers treatment with medicine and surgery.

Cochlear Implants and Meningitis
Children who have cochlear implants have a higher risk of getting bacterial meningitis. A cochlear implant is a device is implanted in the inner ear to treat severe hearing loss that does not improve with hearing aids. Experts think one or...

Cochlear Implants
A cochlear implant is a small electronic device that can help "make" sound if you have a certain type of severe hearing loss in both ears. The implant does the job of the damaged or absent nerve cells that in a normal ear make it possible to hear....

Congenital Heart Defects: Prostaglandins and Prostaglandin Inhibitors
Normally, a blood vessel needed only for fetal blood circulation (called the ductus arteriosus) closes off at birth. As the fetus develops, this blood vessel is kept open by a substance in the fetus's body called prostaglandin. At birth,...

Congenital Heart Defects: Complications
Most children and adults who have corrected congenital heart defects lead healthy lives. But complications sometimes develop. These complications may start when the child is very young, or they may start in adulthood. Heart failure. This is a...

Congenital Heart Defects: Caring for Your Child
Caring for a child with a congenital heart defect can be challenging. The following tips may help you care for your child so that he or she is as healthy and comfortable as possible. These tips may also help you cope with the difficulties that...

Heart Catheterization for Congenital Heart Defects
A heart catheterization is a procedure used for both diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart defects. As a test, this procedure allows doctors to see how blood flows through the heart chambers and arteries. As a treatment, the doctor can use...

Congenital Heart Defect Types
There are many types of congenital heart defects. If the defect lowers the amount of oxygen in the body, it is called cyanotic. If the defect doesn't affect oxygen in the body, it is called acyanotic. Cyanotic heart defects are defects that allow...

Congenital Heart Defects in Adults
Adults with congenital heart defects can live long, full, and active lives. But they are different from adults with other heart problems like coronary artery disease. They typically have unique issues with things like birth control, pregnancy, and...

Congenital Heart Defects That Cause Aortic Valve Stenosis
A congenital heart defect is a malformation that has been present since birth. The most common heart defect that causes aortic valve stenosis is a bicuspid aortic valve. A normal (tricuspid) aortic valve has three flaps, or leaflets. A...

Congenital Heart Defects: Pregnancy
Both women and men who have a congenital heart defect need to think about a few things when planning a pregnancy. These include the risks of passing a heart defect to your child as well as the possible health risks of a pregnancy for a woman who has...

Congenital Heart Defects: Exercise and Sports
Children and adults with congenital heart defects can be active and get regular exercise. Most don't have exercise restrictions. But restrictions on the intensity or type of exercise might be needed depending on the type or severity of the defect....